4 Ways to Boost Employee Morale While Working Remotely

Retaining employee morale is a struggle point for many employers right now. The Society for Human Resource Management states that 65% of employers find maintaining employee morale during COVID-19 to be a problem.

It’s not surprising that decreased productivity and disengagement are the result of our current working conditions: working from home, often feeling isolated and anxious about COVID19, having to parent children while focusing on work tasks, unable to make meaningful connections with your coworkers virtually, and feeling burned out with limited outlets to relieve stress.

We have all heard the statistics before and know that happy employees make for a successful business. Disengaged workers can cost anywhere between $483-605 billion per year according to Gallup’s, State of the American Workplace Report, and that’s under normal circumstances.

But how to keep employees happy right now? It’s not so easy. Company owners and managers have to get a bit more creative, and go the extra mile, to keep their teams engaged, productive, and satisfied. We offer some simple ways to boost morale and retain your top talent throughout the pandemic and thereafter:

1. Provide Opportunities for Professional Development: Learning new things has never been easier. Offer your team time and resources to develop new skills, explore their creativity, and catch up on industry trends. This will build confidence and focus while helping to cultivate a growth-mindset for the company. Encourage participation at informative virtual events such as industry specific webinars. Show your employees that there is room to grow, even right now, by moving forward with rather than halting any career advancement opportunities. Lastly, allow your employees to apply their new knowledge as their evolution will ultimately translate into company growth.

2. Recognize & Reward: This is not the time to skimp on praise and recognitions. Mental health issues are on the rise. The challenges of working in isolation have led to lower confidence and general feelings of being left out. Provide recognition to your team for their efforts to keep them feeling motivated and valued. Cultivate a work environment that supports constant feedback and acknowledgement. Consider rewarding employees for achieving targets and delivering quality work.

3. Celebrate “Togetherness”: Making work fun is a bit tricky right now when you can’t treat your team to after work drinks or organize a company scavenger hunt where colleagues can bond over an entertaining activity. But it doesn’t mean that it can’t happen in other ways. Virtual company events can be as effective in bonding coworkers and providing opportunities for some fun. There are several new companies on the market right now that offer moderated virtual events such as murder mystery or bingo games.

4. Increase flexibility: Being a flexible employer right now is key. Working from home can easily blur the line between professional and personal life. This is part of the challenge and the reason why many employees are feeling overwhelmed, overworked, and therefore disengaged. And with kids at home it is often difficult to maintain a 9-5 schedule. Acknowledge these struggle points and work with your team to develop a plan that will ensure optimal productivity even if that means they have to take the afternoon off but work into the night.

Make employee wellness the center of your business strategy. Invest in strengthening your employees’ emotional commitment towards work and focus on engagement practices that will help them to flourish and feel united with the company.

Will a four-day work week become the new normal of employment?

In 2018, nearly 70 per cent of Canadians said they would prefer a compressed four-day work week, rather than a five-day work week, according to an Angus Reid poll. Not much has changed since then. Many leaders, in fact, are now weighing the opportunity of utilizing a compressed work structure to rebuild the current economy.

We surveyed our LinkedIn audience about the benefits of a four-day work week, and the results were not surprising. 54 per cent of the respondents claimed that it would bring in greater work-life balance, while 34 percent suggested that it would increase productivity.

So here’s the big question: are businesses and government organizations equipped to embrace a four-day work week? This idea is compelling and feasible but it requires thorough evaluation and strategic execution.

1. Who Would Benefit? Companies should consider which demographic of people would benefit the most from a compressed work week. Some believe that a 4-day work week would best suit people who are in their 50’s and 60’s. This economically influential generation can make use of an extra day off by attending to tasks that are being put off such as doctor’s appointments, spending time with loved ones or pursuing a new passion. On the other hand, millennials and gen Z’s are more focused on shaping work priorities in ways that fit their daily lives, which includes remote work or a compressed work week.

2. Establishing A Trial Period: A four-day work structure is highly dependent on business and employee needs. Employees are drawn towards companies that offer flexibility and with a four-day work week concept, companies can become more desirable to job seekers. Perhaps doing a trial run for a couple of months and monitoring productivity and employee satisfaction is a good beginning point. In 2018, New Zealand’s Perpetual Guardian, a trust management company, tested this compressed work structure for 2 months with 240 team members. Productivity levels increased by 20 per cent and employee stress levels reduced by 7 per cent. Similarly, in August 2019, Microsoft Japan experimented this concept with it’s Work-Life Choice Challenge Summer Program, giving 2,300 employees five Fridays off without a pay decrease and a 40 per cent increase in productivity.

3. Assessing Business Operations: To evaluate whether a 4-day work concept is suitable for a company, leadership teams need to start by understanding their work culture and make decisions around the seasonality of their business. For instance, in California, an employee is entitled to over-time pay after eight hours of work a day. This means a non-exempt employee on a four-day work week would be receiving eight hours of overtime pay every week, if companies move to a 4 day, 40 work hours scenario.

4. Stakeholder Evaluation: Businesses should examine the impact of a four-day work week structure on its stakeholders on both sides of the value chain. Will companies lose valuable business by not being available five days of the week? If your clients/vendors operate on a traditional work schedule, but your team is working a compressed week, how is this going to impact coordination and ultimately productivity? Be prepared for the challenges associated with a compressed work week and plan accordingly to mitigate any issues.


A three-day weekend sounds great, but it may not be suitable for everyone and every business. There are certainly pros and cons to doing this. Will it become a new normal of employment? Perhaps. But it will likely happen in stages and require a widespread change in attitude.

5 Tips for Successful Business Continuity During COVID19

By our sister company, ProVision Staffing

Even under these unprecedented circumstances, some businesses are continuing to operate smoothly. What’s their secret? They acknowledge the challenges and also focus on the opportunities to make their company more resilient.

We offer 5 important strategies for businesses on a mission to stay alive, stay relevant, and come out of this pandemic less harmed:

1. Invest in remote work setups – Since 2010, the amount of people that work remotely once a week has grown by 400%. (Hubspot Research) Prior to the global pandemic, only 41% of global businesses offered remote work flexibility (flexjobs.com). Now is the time to increase your company’s investments in videoconferencing tools and collaboration software, many of which do not require a huge budget.

2. Consider contract employment – Contract employment gives businesses the freedom to “hire talent on-demand”. The flexibility and scalability of contract staffing allows businesses to achieve their long-term and short-term growth targets, which makes this staffing solution ideal for challenging economic times.

3. Keep communicating with & supporting your employees – It becomes extremely crucial to calm and reassure your workforce during such uncertain times. Employers must encourage upskilling, boost morale with special incentives and schedule regular video calls etc to maintain your teams momentum.

4. Plan for the future – Use this decrease in pace to re-evaluate and identify new business opportunities. Start building new connections, growing your social media presence and developing a strong comprehensive plan for COVID19 recovery.

5. Support your client base – Show your clients that you are here for them, and that you care about them. Avoid pushing for sales and take the time to listen to their concerns. Strengthen existing relationships by providing solutions that will appeal to them and that are relevant under existing circumstances. It is important to be recognize and plan that your customers’ requirements might change post COVID19.

It’s important for businesses to be adaptable and open to change. Post COVID-19 the world will likely be a different place, at least for the next little while, and businesses that are set up to adapt to the “new normal” will have the competitive advantage.

Contract Staffing To Support Your Business

PTC has been in the recruitment business for 3 decades and has witnessed multiple economic ups and downs, from the global financial crisis to the current COVID-19 pandemic. As we navigate this unprecedented landscape and its impact on the economy, we continue to support companies by providing temporary and contract staffing solutions. 

Businesses can benefit from contract staffing in a number of ways, especially in such challenging periods:

Cost-Effective Solution 

In order to remain competitive, to reduce overhead costs and to manage cash flows in such uncertain times, hiring temporary employees proves to be a cost-effective solution. Temporary employees work on specific projects for certain number of hours. If your business is seeking short-term support or requires additional help to manage workload due to unexpected external variables, hiring contract workers is ideal. 

Specialized Workforce 

Temporary and contract workers are equipped with specialized skill sets and hone a wide range of industry knowledge and experience. As a result, they are well-armed to fill skill gaps within an organization, allowing for businesses to continue with smooth operations.

Shorter Hiring Process

Businesses turn to contract workforce solutions because they benefit from a shorter hiring process. Contractors are experienced with time-sensitive projects and are often available to start immediately, once hired. 

Contract To Hire 

Hiring contractors is a great way for companies to test the waters and assess cultural fit. Companies get to work with contractors for a definitive period of time, allowing them to evaluate their skills and performance without having the pressure to commit to permanent employment.

Increase Talent Pool

Given this economic climate, many experienced candidates find themselves either unemployed or underemployed. Companies should use this opportunity to conduct a thorough ‘candidate market’ assessment and expand their talent pool to meet future workforce demand once the crisis settles. 

As we face the long-reaching implications of COVID-19 together, our goal is to support and champion your staffing needs at all times.